Monarto Safari Park and Adelaide Zoo are now open and you must book a ticket prior to your visit. Following SA Health directions, face masks are now mandatory at all times while visiting. Read More

South Australian Mainland Tammar Wallabies were officially listed as extinct in the wild in the 1920s. The Tammar Wallaby population declined due to a combination of land clearing, impacts of settlers’ fires, predation by introduced predators and hunting by early settlers. The species was fortunately given a second chance, after a feral population introduced to New Zealand was brought back to Australia to re-establish the species at Innes National Park on Yorke Peninsula, South Australia.

A team of Zoos SA staff from Monarto Safari Park have been involved in the captive breeding and release of this species. Releases have been very successful and there are now no further releases required at this stage. Zoos SA continues to monitor the success of the new wild population.

Our partners include the Department for Environment, Water and Natural Resources, University of Adelaide, Australian Government, Conservation Volunteers Australia.

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Mainland Tammar Wallaby

Lockdown jobs?…. Hope the Chimpanzee giving the windows a clean! Another job? Find your old mobile phones and recy… https://t.co/CcE8jlzIPE

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About Zoos SA

Zoos SA is a not-for-profit conservation charity that exists to connect people with nature and save species from extinction. Zoos SA acknowledges the Country on which we stand always was, and always will be, Aboriginal land and we pay our deepest respect and gratitude to Kaurna (Adelaide Zoo) and Ngarrindjeri (Monarto Safari Park) Elders, past, present and emerging. We undertake critical conservation work throughout Australia and acknowledge the traditional custodians of these lands.

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