South Australian Mainland Tammar Wallabies were officially listed as extinct in the wild in the 1920s. The Tammar Wallaby population declined due to a combination of land clearing, impacts of settlers’ fires, predation by introduced predators and hunting by early settlers. The species was fortunately given a second chance, after a feral population introduced to New Zealand was brought back to Australia to re-establish the species at Innes National Park on Yorke Peninsula, South Australia.

A team of Zoos SA staff from Monarto Zoo have been involved in the captive breeding and release of this species. Releases have been very successful and there are now no further releases required at this stage. Zoos SA continues to monitor the success of the new wild population.

Our partners include the Department for Environment, Water and Natural Resources, University of Adelaide, Australian Government, Conservation Volunteers Australia.

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Mainland Tammar Wallaby

Congratulations to our Chief Executive Elaine Bensted on receiving the #telstrabizwomen 'for purpose and social enterprise' award tonight.

About Zoos SA

Zoos SA is a not-for-profit conservation charity that exists to save species from extinction and connect people with nature.

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